Types of miso

Miso classes

Hatcho,
Hatcho, a variety of miso, made with fermented soy beans. Very rich in proteins

What are the main varieties of miso?

There are many varieties of miso, although only a few of them are consumed in the West.

At commercial level, the best known elaborations are the following:

  • Soy miso: It’s called Hatcho. It is the miso variety that is made only with soybeans and, therefore,  it is the one with the highest levels of protein. It is produced by a longer elaboration process, exceeding two years, and consequently has a stronger smell, a darker color and a salty taste,
  •  Soy and rice misso: It is known as Komé if it is made with white rice, and, if it is made with whole rice, it is called Genmai. It is a type of miso to which rice has been added. It has a milder taste and a slightly lower processing than the average of two years,
  • Soy and barley miso: it is known as Mugí. It is a variety of miso to which barley is added. Its intensity of flavor is intermediate between the previous ones.
  • Soy and wheat miso: It is known as Shiro. It is lighter in color, like whitish.
  • Soybeans and chickpeas miso: It is called “yellow miso” because another legume has been added that gives it this color, chickpeas.

Other classes or varieties of miso

In addition to the endless number of possible varieties, they may or may not be pasteurized, with two main purposes:

  1. To ensure the hygiene and conservation of this food
  2. To paralyze the fermentation reactions.

Obviously, if the product is subjected to pasteurization systems, we will not obtain the probiotic benefits of the live microorganisms that this fermentation gives us, since with the temperature they will die ceasing to be effective their properties.

punto rojo More information on miso and soy products

Editorial
Written by Editorial Botanical-online team in charge of content writing

12 December, 2019

Other interesting articles

Botanical-online is an informative page that describes, among other topics, the traditional uses of plants from a therapeutic point of view. Their descriptions do not replace professional advice. Botanical-online is not responsible for self-medication and recommends consulting with the physician.
Ok